#BYOD4L Day one: Connecting

So, I’m beginning #BYOD4L and I’m not sure where to start. I’ve introduced myself (ILO1) and said hello to a few people, and I’m going to play in the Twitter conversation later. I have Google+ and Twitter and Facebook open on my computer and have (and will continue) to comment on them.

And I’m reflecting on what I do here (ILO3) but I’m a little concerned about creating ‘a digital artefact on [my] own or with others that capture[s my] learning based on discoveries linked to one of the scenarios’. It is interesting to be in this position again. To be a student, unclear of exactly what it is that is expected of me. (I don’t want to be asking ‘what is it they want me to do?’ and yet I find myself thinking this.  :-))

So, for now I am going to think about the scenarios instead, and specifically scenario two: a lecturer who doesn’t ‘do’ technology. She has a mobile and an iPad, but doesn’t really know what to do with either, or why to do it and thinks its all for nerds or a waste of time. So, her question is: can she do her job (lectures, seminars, practicals) without using it all?

My simple answer is yes! I work with a number of very successful academics who use very little tech and are supersuccessful in what they do.

But here’s the thing… For me, tech is here and it’s coming and it will continue to come. And increasingly it is being demanded by students, or used by students, to approach their learning. And sometimes there are brilliant solutions that tech can provide that will enhance her ability to teach. For example, Aropä allows students to answer a question, mark a number of their peers answers and then get feedback on their own, with very little administration from the teaching staff, so freeing time to have conversations about learning instead.

So, should she be forced to use Apps – no. Could someone sit down with her and discuss the things she does and the things she’d like to do with her students and see if there’s a way that tech can help her to engage her students in learning – yes, absolutely!

For my practice: I have to remember how it is to be a student (I do try) and that finding a tech solution to student learning and engagement conundrum needs to be approached with care…

Oh, and I just learned how to do umlauts on a mac!

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5 thoughts on “#BYOD4L Day one: Connecting

  1. Hi Amanda, I really enjoyed reading your post. Pleased the scenario made you think and question. Also wonderful to read about your thoughts of being a student again and how this feels. To often we forget perhaps?

    I really like your idea about discussing with the lecturer and identifying opportunities together. What if the lecturer is not interested or doesn’t see any value in using any of these. Any ideas how you could approach this?

    Looking forward to your ideas. Wonderful that you joined us Amanda.

    Speak again soon,
    Chrissi

    • Thanks Chrissi.

      If the lecturer’s not interested then it gets tricky, personally and politically. In reality there’s also a resource issue – my time is kinda full so I’m not sure how much time I would be able to devote to the conversation if the response is so negative.

      But, I would hope that we could talk about it from an ‘engaging student learning’ perspective. I also think that, with the widespread use of platforms such as Blackboard and Moodle lecturers are increasingly being forced to use tech and so it might be an alternative way in to have the conversation…

      I’m waffling a little as I’m clear that I cannot force someone, but I do think there are solutions that are worth considering…

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