#BYOD4L Day three: Curating

This is the topic I’ve been looking forward to the most: curating.

As I said in a previous post, I struggle with the myriad ways to curate information and with filtering information too. And if I do, then I figure undergraduates must too.

In response to my concerns about ‘ways’, a colleague of mine told me that the best thing to do is find a tool I like and stick with it – make everything I curate open to the people I want to share it with and stop worrying about what else is out there. I think this is GREAT advice, and the joy of BYOD4L is that I’m getting the opportunity to look at the curating tools that are out there.

And, in the spirit of trying tools that are new to me I joined the #BYOD4L Google hangout today. And then I had to leave, suddenly, with no explanation because I needed to go home. Which started me thinking about scenario two (bear with me, there is a link…). The lecturer describes providing all sorts of extra resources, but that her students don’t use them, they only do the things they have to do for assessment. I guess this is a good example that the old (oft misquoted) adage, ‘build it and they will come’ [it’s actually ‘build it and he will come’ from the movie Field of Dreams] is not really true.

For me this is an issue about design. Students are crazy busy people so often have to be strategic; they need to concentrate on the things that will make a difference to them. And every now and again they are likely to have to suddenly leave too, just like I did today (see I told you there was a link) and so the design of learning activities and resources needs to be such that  there is a reason for students to use them, or revisit them if life gets in the way (the video of the Hangout is a great resource). Either that or we need to think about how we introduce students to the culture of Higher Ed and show them the value of reading around a subject so that they can see the value of taking the time to immerse themselves in the resources we provide, rather than in something else.

If engaging with additional resources will help students many of them will engage, so I’d suggest that the design of teaching and assessment probably needs a different emphasis. Instead of teaching stuff, reward process. So, for example, begin a repository of relevant articles, then require the students to add to this repository and then discuss the articles in a seminar or interactive lecture, then the links have worth. This could be done in Pinterest or Scoop.it or on a wiki in the University supported learning platform.

Another idea I particularly like is to award some of the assessment grade to students when they show how they researched their essay/project/assignment. You can do this by getting them to draw a ‘map’ of their research journey (have a look at this paper for an example) and it helps to avoid plagiarism too.

Ultimately I believe that the skills of filtering and curating useful information are the skills we need to be learning, for ourselves and with our students, because to be able to do this successfully is becoming more and more important in an age where ‘stuff’ (content/information) is easily and freely available.

 

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3 thoughts on “#BYOD4L Day three: Curating

  1. I really enjoyed reading this post Amanda, and I found myself nodding my head furiously at two key points in the article: 1) The advice given to you by your friend at the start of the article, and 2) your statement at the end if the article that we should learn about the best practice(s) of curating WITH the students. Picking something that works for you and rolling with it without distraction is great advice (the grass is always greener etc.), and the rawness of digital curating means that everybody (or at least almost everybody) is still learning, and our students could gain so much by coming on that journey with us.

    • Thanks for your thoughtful comments Sam. I really believe in learning with our students. Somehow it seems to me that we can all only benefit and although the prospect may be a little scary for some people at the beginning, the results are usually very positive.

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